George W. M Reynolds, Charles Dickens

And Mr. Pickwick.

by

R.E. Prindle

One is mystified concerning the importance of Charles Dickens’ Pickwick Paper in Reynolds’ career.  One almost thinks that he is trying to steal Dickens’ identity.  The significance of the influence does not end with Reynolds continuation of Dickens Pickwick Papers but continues throughout his life.  In fact, Dickens himself adapted his style to that of Reynolds, especially in his novel ‘Our Mutual Friend’.  It’s as though he moved to blend with Reynolds.  Perhaps the title might even refer to the two writers rivalry.

Dickens began publishing his Pickwick in March of 1836 in serial magazine form that ended after twenty numbers; actually nineteen as the last two installments sold as a unit, perhaps to publish the book while the title was hot.  Each installment sold for a shilling.  Twenty shillings makes up a pound.  The book was then published in 1837.

George Reynolds who had exiled himself to France at the end of 1830 returned to England in 1836.  He was then twenty-two.  Dickens was twenty-four, both very young..  Reynolds who had earned a literary reputation in France was quickly employed as the editor of The Monthly Magazine where he watched the amazing success of the Pickwick Papers.  He itched to be such a successful author.  He had everything but a format. 

Reynolds had matured far beyond his years in France.  He was only sixteen when he left England on his own, thus as a mere youth he had to grope his way through the Parisian jungle.

He had a capacious mind while being very ambitious.  He succeeded until he was swindled of his money.  Along the way he assumed, or tried to assume the character of a Man of the World.  Interestingly Dickens admired and assumed the role of a Man of Feeling; it was the direct opposite of The Man of the World.

While Reynolds would turn out to be an astonishing author with the hard edge of a Man of the World he needed a framework or model to portray his own work.  In this case he chose the Pickwick Papers.  In 1844 and the Mysteries of London he would model his novel on the Frenchman Eugene Sue’s Mysteries of Paris. 

In a rather breathtaking way he appropriated Dickens’ characters and method.  Having just returned from Paris with a satchel full of impressions he placed Pickwick in France and called his work Pickwick Abroad.  Apart from the fact that the two novels had two different authors the continuation was quite seamless and logical; they might as well have been vol. one and two.

Dickens’ novel was published in 1837 and Reynolds in 1839.  Sort of the proper distance for the sequel to be published.  Thus Reynolds was riding Dickens’ coattails very closely.  As it turns out, according to E.F. Bleiler of Dover Books, Abroad was a near best seller, perhaps rivalling PP.  That implies at least several thousand copies, perhaps into ten digits.

Dickens’ serial was selling forty thousand copies an issue near the end so the numbers may be even higher.  Remember half or better of the England’s population was illiterate at the time.  Naturally Dickens was enraged, despising Reynolds the rest of his life, although ‘Our Mutual Friend’ may acknowledge recognition of their influence on each other.

Reynolds’ work had, at least, four different editions over time; not printings but separate editions.  The first two were in 1839, the second in 1857, and the last in 1864.  Each date is significant.  It’s possible that there were others but I am unacquainted with them if there are. 

What is considered the first edition was printed for the publisher Thomas Tegg, Cheapside, R. Griffen and Co., Glasgow, and Tegg and Co., Dublin and also S.A. Tegg, Sydney and Hobart Town.

The second first of 1839 was published by Greenwood, Gilbert and Piper, Paternoster Row.  Both were 600+ pages, single volume.  Both as deluxe editions bound in leather.  As Greenwood was a name assumed by Eugene, Richard’s brother of Mysteries of Paris, there may be something fishy about this edition.  Both had forty-one full page illustrations and 33 woodcuts.

Two first editions in the same year is somewhat unusual, and perhaps unique.  I have no information on which came first while Greenwood, Gilbert and Piper may be relatively unknown.  How the sales were divided between the two I couldn’t guess.

The Teggs edition would imply that the book was placed on sale simultaneously in England, Scotland, Australia and New Zealand.  Perhaps inflamed by Dickens’ success the twenty-two year old aspiring Man of the World envisioned the most enormous of successes sparing no expense and effort.

The books had  forty-one full page inserted illustrations and thirty-three woodcuts. As Reynolds said the pictures ran the cost of publishing up so he must have been expecting really marvelous results.  As he closely followed Dickens publishing methods also publishing twenty installments at a shilling each, as the book was well received being a near best seller, according to Bleiler I think it fair to assume that Reynolds repaired his financial position, especially as Bleiler says that in his personal financing publishing with the Temperance Society a year or two later he lost money heavily.  If he had the money to lose it would have had to have come from Pickwick Abroad.

The next edition in time, that of Henry Lea of Paternoster Row by the author of “Robert Macaire In England, etc. etc”. Now, the 1857 edition was published outside the partnership of Reynolds and John Dicks therefore it seems probable that Reynolds didn’t cut Dicks in on any profits.  So Reynolds considered Pickwick Abroad as his own separate property.  This would hold true of the 1864 edition also.  Whether that caused any problems between Reynolds and Dicks isn’t known.

The copyrights for The Mysteries of Paris published earlier were also held outside the partnership by Stiff and Vickers the original publishers .  Now this gets interesting.  In 1856 Reynolds completed his novels Mysteries of London and Mysteries of the Court of London that he considered one work. These two books were a monumental work extending from 1844 to 1856, that is twelve years.  That must have been very exhausting.

My question is why did he cap his masterwork with a new edition of Pickwick Abroad?  How do they relate to Dickens?  I speculate that  it is not improbable that Pickwick formed some sort of psychological  connection to Dickens, the Man of Feeling,  himself, while Dickens, who was not all that prolific was increasingly drawn into the same psychological  connection with Reynolds as is seen by his adoption of Reynolds methods and style specially as seen in his novel ‘Our Mutual Friend.’

There is a significant psychological difference between the two authors which might explain their seeming magnetic attraction to each other.  Dickens in a list of eighteenth century authors that influenced him named a writer named Henry MacKenzie.  That was a new name to me.  Upon checking I learned that he wrote a 1771 novelette titled ‘The Man of Feeling’, following it by a novelette titled ‘The Man of the World’.

Dickens wrote sentimental novels as The Man of Feeling while Reynolds wrote hard edged realism as the Man of the World that he longed to be.  Each supplied what the other lacked.  Just a thought.  Both men were top sellers although Dickens sentimentalism has survived two centuries and continuing while Reynolds’ hard edged man of the world stuff was buried by 1914 although the American author Edgar Rice Burroughs had read The Mysteries of the Court of London somewhen before 1914 as a reference shows up in his ‘Outlaw of Torn’.  But until E.F. Bleilers resuscitation of ‘Wagner the Werwolf’ in 1975 Reynolds had been out of print.

At any rate Dickens Pickwick Papers is a monument to sentimentalism or feeling while Reynolds comes down heavy on fairly brutal realism.  The contrast as well as similarities between the two is quite striking.  Between the two of them they definitely dominated middle century literature.

One might note, however, that of the two brothers of Mysteries of London Eugene is a man of the world while Richard is a man of feeling.  Once again, a strong contrast.  The story of Richard and Castelcicala might even be called a fairy tale.  Reynolds then republished Pickwick Abroad after he finished his major work.  This raises the question of what is the relationship of Abroad to the long Mysteries novels?  Those two novels are bracketed by Abroad indicating enclosure.  Thus Abroad and the Mysteries are one unit.

So, we have the two first editions of 1839, 1857, and finally the last edition of 1864 after Reynolds had laid down his novelistic pen. Thus we have the end of the novels and the first and last editions of Pickwick Abroad enclosing the whole of Reynolds production.  Is it all one unit resolving Reynolds’ psychology?  He sold his copyrights to John Dicks so he dumped his whole life from 1839 to 1864.  He was free from it. 

Was that his intent?

Of course his beloved wife Susannah had died in 1858 and that most definitely  took the spunk out of the man. He didn’t remarry and possibly didn’t even look for another wife.  Things very probably just emptied out.

If there are other editions of Pickwick Abroad I haven’t found them.

Dickens, Charles, Pickwick Papers, 1837

Dickens, Charles, Our Mutual Friend, 1865

McKenzie, Henry, The Man of Feeling, 1781

McKenzie, Henry, The Man of the World

Reynolds, George W. M., Pickwick Abroad, Tegg & Co., 1839

Reynolds, George W. M. Pickwick Abroad, Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1839

Reynolds, Pickwick Abroad, Henry Lea, 1857

George W. M Reynolds, Charles Dickens

And Mr. Pickwick.

by

R.E. Prindle

One is mystified concerning the importance of Charles Dickens’ Pickwick Paper in Reynolds’ career.  One almost thinks that he is trying to steal Dickens’ identity.  The significance of the influence does not end with Reynolds continuation of Dickens Pickwick Papers but continues throughout his life.  In fact, Dickens himself adapted his style to that of Reynolds, especially in his novel ‘Our Mutual Friend’.  It’s as though he moved to blend with Reynolds.  Perhaps the title might even refer to the two writers rivalry.

Dickens began publishing his Pickwick in March of 1836 in serial magazine form that ended after twenty numbers; actually nineteen as the last two installments sold as a unit, perhaps to publish the book while the title was hot.  Each installment sold for a shilling.  Twenty shillings makes up a pound.  The book was then published in 1837.

George Reynolds who had exiled himself to France at the end of 1830 returned to England in 1836.  He was then twenty-two.  Dickens was twenty-four, both very young..  Reynolds who had earned a literary reputation in France was quickly employed as the editor of The Monthly Magazine where he watched the amazing success of the Pickwick Papers.  He itched to be such a successful author.  He had everything but a format. 

Reynolds had matured far beyond his years in France.  He was only sixteen when he left England on his own, thus as a mere youth he had to grope his way through the Parisian jungle.

He had a capacious mind while being very ambitious.  He succeeded until he was swindled of his money.  Along the way he assumed, or tried to assume the character of a Man of the World.  Interestingly Dickens admired and assumed the role of a Man of Feeling; it was the direct opposite of The Man of the World.

While Reynolds would turn out to be an astonishing author with the hard edge of a Man of the World he needed a framework or model to portray his own work.  In this case he chose the Pickwick Papers.  In 1844 and the Mysteries of London he would model his novel on the Frenchman Eugene Sue’s Mysteries of Paris. 

In a rather breathtaking way he appropriated Dickens’ characters and method.  Having just returned from Paris with a satchel full of impressions he placed Pickwick in France and called his work Pickwick Abroad.  Apart from the fact that the two novels had two different authors the continuation was quite seamless and logical; they might as well have been vol. one and two.

Dickens’ novel was published in 1837 and Reynolds in 1839.  Sort of the proper distance for the sequel to be published.  Thus Reynolds was riding Dickens’ coattails very closely.  As it turns out, according to E.F. Bleiler of Dover Books, Abroad was a near best seller, perhaps rivalling PP.  That implies at least several thousand copies, perhaps into ten digits.

Dickens’ serial was selling forty thousand copies an issue near the end so the numbers may be even higher.  Remember half or better of the England’s population was illiterate at the time.  Naturally Dickens was enraged, despising Reynolds the rest of his life, although ‘Our Mutual Friend’ may acknowledge recognition of their influence on each other.

Reynolds’ work had, at least, four different editions over time; not printings but separate editions.  The first two were in 1839, the second in 1857, and the last in 1864.  Each date is significant.  It’s possible that there were others but I am unacquainted with them if there are. 

What is considered the first edition was printed for the publisher Thomas Tegg, Cheapside, R. Griffen and Co., Glasgow, and Tegg and Co., Dublin and also S.A. Tegg, Sydney and Hobart Town.

The second first of 1839 was published by Greenwood, Gilbert and Piper, Paternoster Row.  Both were 600+ pages, single volume.  Both as deluxe editions bound in leather.  As Greenwood was a name assumed by Eugene, Richard’s brother of Mysteries of Paris, there may be something fishy about this edition.  Both had forty-one full page illustrations and 33 woodcuts.

Two first editions in the same year is somewhat unusual, and perhaps unique.  I have no information on which came first while Greenwood, Gilbert and Piper may be relatively unknown.  How the sales were divided between the two I couldn’t guess.

The Teggs edition would imply that the book was placed on sale simultaneously in England, Scotland, Australia and New Zealand.  Perhaps inflamed by Dickens’ success the twenty-two year old aspiring Man of the World envisioned the most enormous of successes sparing no expense and effort.

The books had  forty-one full page inserted illustrations and thirty-three woodcuts. As Reynolds said the pictures ran the cost of publishing up so he must have been expecting really marvelous results.  As he closely followed Dickens publishing methods also publishing twenty installments at a shilling each, as the book was well received being a near best seller, according to Bleiler I think it fair to assume that Reynolds repaired his financial position, especially as Bleiler says that in his personal financing publishing with the Temperance Society a year or two later he lost money heavily.  If he had the money to lose it would have had to have come from Pickwick Abroad.

The next edition in time, that of Henry Lea of Paternoster Row by the author of “Robert Macaire In England, etc. etc”. Now, the 1857 edition was published outside the partnership of Reynolds and John Dicks therefore it seems probable that Reynolds didn’t cut Dicks in on any profits.  So Reynolds considered Pickwick Abroad as his own separate property.  This would hold true of the 1864 edition also.  Whether that caused any problems between Reynolds and Dicks isn’t known.

The copyrights for The Mysteries of Paris published earlier were also held outside the partnership by Stiff and Vickers the original publishers .  Now this gets interesting.  In 1856 Reynolds completed his novels Mysteries of London and Mysteries of the Court of London that he considered one work. These two books were a monumental work extending from 1844 to 1856, that is twelve years.  That must have been very exhausting.

My question is why did he cap his masterwork with a new edition of Pickwick Abroad?  How do they relate to Dickens?  I speculate that  it is not improbable that Pickwick formed some sort of psychological  connection to Dickens, the Man of Feeling,  himself, while Dickens, who was not all that prolific was increasingly drawn into the same psychological  connection with Reynolds as is seen by his adoption of Reynolds methods and style specially as seen in his novel ‘Our Mutual Friend.’

There is a significant psychological difference between the two authors which might explain their seeming magnetic attraction to each other.  Dickens in a list of eighteenth century authors that influenced him named a writer named Henry MacKenzie.  That was a new name to me.  Upon checking I learned that he wrote a 1771 novelette titled ‘The Man of Feeling’, following it by a novelette titled ‘The Man of the World’.

Dickens wrote sentimental novels as The Man of Feeling while Reynolds wrote hard edged realism as the Man of the World that he longed to be.  Each supplied what the other lacked.  Just a thought.  Both men were top sellers although Dickens sentimentalism has survived two centuries and continuing while Reynolds’ hard edged man of the world stuff was buried by 1914 although the American author Edgar Rice Burroughs had read The Mysteries of the Court of London somewhen before 1914 as a reference shows up in his ‘Outlaw of Torn’.  But until E.F. Bleilers resuscitation of ‘Wagner the Werwolf’ in 1975 Reynolds had been out of print.

At any rate Dickens Pickwick Papers is a monument to sentimentalism or feeling while Reynolds comes down heavy on fairly brutal realism.  The contrast as well as similarities between the two is quite striking.  Between the two of them they definitely dominated middle century literature.

One might note, however, that of the two brothers of Mysteries of London Eugene is a man of the world while Richard is a man of feeling.  Once again, a strong contrast.  The story of Richard and Castelcicala might even be called a fairy tale.  Reynolds then republished Pickwick Abroad after he finished his major work.  This raises the question of what is the relationship of Abroad to the long Mysteries novels?  Those two novels are bracketed by Abroad indicating enclosure.  Thus Abroad and the Mysteries are one unit.

So, we have the two first editions of 1839, 1857, and finally the last edition of 1864 after Reynolds had laid down his novelistic pen. Thus we have the end of the novels and the first and last editions of Pickwick Abroad enclosing the whole of Reynolds production.  Is it all one unit resolving Reynolds’ psychology?  He sold his copyrights to John Dicks so he dumped his whole life from 1839 to 1864.  He was free from it. 

Was that his intent?

Of course his beloved wife Susannah had died in 1858 and that most definitely  took the spunk out of the man. He didn’t remarry and possibly didn’t even look for another wife.  Things very probably just emptied out.

If there are other editions of Pickwick Abroad I haven’t found them.

Dickens, Charles, Pickwick Papers, 1837

Dickens, Charles, Our Mutual Friend, 1865

McKenzie, Henry, The Man of Feeling, 1781

McKenzie, Henry, The Man of the World

Reynolds, George W. M., Pickwick Abroad, Tegg & Co., 1839

Reynolds, George W. M. Pickwick Abroad, Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1839

Reynolds, Pickwick Abroad, Henry Lea, 1857

Reynolds, Pickwick Abroad. Henry G. Bohn, 1864 Reynolds, Wagner the Werwolf, forward by E.F. Bleiler, Dover Books,

George W. M Reynolds, Charles Dickens

And Mr. Pickwick.

by

R.E. Prindle

One is mystified concerning the importance of Charles Dickens’ Pickwick Paper in Reynolds’ career.  One almost thinks that he is trying to steal Dickens’ identity.  The significance of the influence does not end with Reynolds continuation of Dickens Pickwick Papers but continues throughout his life.  In fact, Dickens himself adapted his style to that of Reynolds, especially in his novel ‘Our Mutual Friend’.  It’s as though he moved to blend with Reynolds.  Perhaps the title might even refer to the two writers rivalry.

Dickens began publishing his Pickwick in March of 1836 in serial magazine form that ended after twenty numbers; actually nineteen as the last two installments sold as a unit, perhaps to publish the book while the title was hot.  Each installment sold for a shilling.  Twenty shillings makes up a pound.  The book was then published in 1837.

George Reynolds who had exiled himself to France at the end of 1830 returned to England in 1836.  He was then twenty-two.  Dickens was twenty-four, both very young..  Reynolds who had earned a literary reputation in France was quickly employed as the editor of The Monthly Magazine where he watched the amazing success of the Pickwick Papers.  He itched to be such a successful author.  He had everything but a format. 

Reynolds had matured far beyond his years in France.  He was only sixteen when he left England on his own, thus as a mere youth he had to grope his way through the Parisian jungle.

He had a capacious mind while being very ambitious.  He succeeded until he was swindled of his money.  Along the way he assumed, or tried to assume the character of a Man of the World.  Interestingly Dickens admired and assumed the role of a Man of Feeling; it was the direct opposite of The Man of the World.

While Reynolds would turn out to be an astonishing author with the hard edge of a Man of the World he needed a framework or model to portray his own work.  In this case he chose the Pickwick Papers.  In 1844 and the Mysteries of London he would model his novel on the Frenchman Eugene Sue’s Mysteries of Paris. 

In a rather breathtaking way he appropriated Dickens’ characters and method.  Having just returned from Paris with a satchel full of impressions he placed Pickwick in France and called his work Pickwick Abroad.  Apart from the fact that the two novels had two different authors the continuation was quite seamless and logical; they might as well have been vol. one and two.

Dickens’ novel was published in 1837 and Reynolds in 1839.  Sort of the proper distance for the sequel to be published.  Thus Reynolds was riding Dickens’ coattails very closely.  As it turns out, according to E.F. Bleiler of Dover Books, Abroad was a near best seller, perhaps rivalling PP.  That implies at least several thousand copies, perhaps into ten digits.

Dickens’ serial was selling forty thousand copies an issue near the end so the numbers may be even higher.  Remember half or better of the England’s population was illiterate at the time.  Naturally Dickens was enraged, despising Reynolds the rest of his life, although ‘Our Mutual Friend’ may acknowledge recognition of their influence on each other.

Reynolds’ work had, at least, four different editions over time; not printings but separate editions.  The first two were in 1839, the second in 1857, and the last in 1864.  Each date is significant.  It’s possible that there were others but I am unacquainted with them if there are. 

What is considered the first edition was printed for the publisher Thomas Tegg, Cheapside, R. Griffen and Co., Glasgow, and Tegg and Co., Dublin and also S.A. Tegg, Sydney and Hobart Town.

The second first of 1839 was published by Greenwood, Gilbert and Piper, Paternoster Row.  Both were 600+ pages, single volume.  Both as deluxe editions bound in leather.  As Greenwood was a name assumed by Eugene, Richard’s brother of Mysteries of Paris, there may be something fishy about this edition.  Both had forty-one full page illustrations and 33 woodcuts.

Two first editions in the same year is somewhat unusual, and perhaps unique.  I have no information on which came first while Greenwood, Gilbert and Piper may be relatively unknown.  How the sales were divided between the two I couldn’t guess.

The Teggs edition would imply that the book was placed on sale simultaneously in England, Scotland, Australia and New Zealand.  Perhaps inflamed by Dickens’ success the twenty-two year old aspiring Man of the World envisioned the most enormous of successes sparing no expense and effort.

The books had  forty-one full page inserted illustrations and thirty-three woodcuts. As Reynolds said the pictures ran the cost of publishing up so he must have been expecting really marvelous results.  As he closely followed Dickens publishing methods also publishing twenty installments at a shilling each, as the book was well received being a near best seller, according to Bleiler I think it fair to assume that Reynolds repaired his financial position, especially as Bleiler says that in his personal financing publishing with the Temperance Society a year or two later he lost money heavily.  If he had the money to lose it would have had to have come from Pickwick Abroad.

The next edition in time, that of Henry Lea of Paternoster Row by the author of “Robert Macaire In England, etc. etc”. Now, the 1857 edition was published outside the partnership of Reynolds and John Dicks therefore it seems probable that Reynolds didn’t cut Dicks in on any profits.  So Reynolds considered Pickwick Abroad as his own separate property.  This would hold true of the 1864 edition also.  Whether that caused any problems between Reynolds and Dicks isn’t known.

The copyrights for The Mysteries of Paris published earlier were also held outside the partnership by Stiff and Vickers the original publishers .  Now this gets interesting.  In 1856 Reynolds completed his novels Mysteries of London and Mysteries of the Court of London that he considered one work. These two books were a monumental work extending from 1844 to 1856, that is twelve years.  That must have been very exhausting.

My question is why did he cap his masterwork with a new edition of Pickwick Abroad?  How do they relate to Dickens?  I speculate that  it is not improbable that Pickwick formed some sort of psychological  connection to Dickens, the Man of Feeling,  himself, while Dickens, who was not all that prolific was increasingly drawn into the same psychological  connection with Reynolds as is seen by his adoption of Reynolds methods and style specially as seen in his novel ‘Our Mutual Friend.’

There is a significant psychological difference between the two authors which might explain their seeming magnetic attraction to each other.  Dickens in a list of eighteenth century authors that influenced him named a writer named Henry MacKenzie.  That was a new name to me.  Upon checking I learned that he wrote a 1771 novelette titled ‘The Man of Feeling’, following it by a novelette titled ‘The Man of the World’.

Dickens wrote sentimental novels as The Man of Feeling while Reynolds wrote hard edged realism as the Man of the World that he longed to be.  Each supplied what the other lacked.  Just a thought.  Both men were top sellers although Dickens sentimentalism has survived two centuries and continuing while Reynolds’ hard edged man of the world stuff was buried by 1914 although the American author Edgar Rice Burroughs had read The Mysteries of the Court of London somewhen before 1914 as a reference shows up in his ‘Outlaw of Torn’.  But until E.F. Bleilers resuscitation of ‘Wagner the Werwolf’ in 1975 Reynolds had been out of print.

At any rate Dickens Pickwick Papers is a monument to sentimentalism or feeling while Reynolds comes down heavy on fairly brutal realism.  The contrast as well as similarities between the two is quite striking.  Between the two of them they definitely dominated middle century literature.

One might note, however, that of the two brothers of Mysteries of London Eugene is a man of the world while Richard is a man of feeling.  Once again, a strong contrast.  The story of Richard and Castelcicala might even be called a fairy tale.  Reynolds then republished Pickwick Abroad after he finished his major work.  This raises the question of what is the relationship of Abroad to the long Mysteries novels?  Those two novels are bracketed by Abroad indicating enclosure.  Thus Abroad and the Mysteries are one unit.

So, we have the two first editions of 1839, 1857, and finally the last edition of 1864 after Reynolds had laid down his novelistic pen. Thus we have the end of the novels and the first and last editions of Pickwick Abroad enclosing the whole of Reynolds production.  Is it all one unit resolving Reynolds’ psychology?  He sold his copyrights to John Dicks so he dumped his whole life from 1839 to 1864.  He was free from it. 

Was that his intent?

Of course his beloved wife Susannah had died in 1858 and that most definitely  took the spunk out of the man. He didn’t remarry and possibly didn’t even look for another wife.  Things very probably just emptied out.

If there are other editions of Pickwick Abroad I haven’t found them.

Dickens, Charles, Pickwick Papers, 1837

Dickens, Charles, Our Mutual Friend, 1865

McKenzie, Henry, The Man of Feeling, 1781

McKenzie, Henry, The Man of the World

Reynolds, George W. M., Pickwick Abroad, Tegg & Co., 1839

Reynolds, George W. M. Pickwick Abroad, Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1839

Reynolds, Pickwick Abroad, Henry Lea, 1857

Reynolds, Pickwick Abroad. Henry G. Bohn, 1864 Reynolds, Wagner the Werwolf, forward by E.F. Bleiler, Dover Books,

Reynolds, Pickwick Abroad. Henry G. Bohn, 1864 Reynolds, Wagner the Werwolf, forward by E.F. Bleiler, Dover Books,